Parentified children and art making

Child_Parent_Reverse-300x300In my work with children who have been removed from abuse or neglect settings, more often than not children will display “parentified” behavior.  These children have experienced a role reversal between parent and child.  The child has, by necessity, taken over the parental role, sacrificing their own needs in order to maintain the needs of the parent.  Foster or adoptive parents will often complain that their child is consistently arguing, being bossy, manipulating, sneaking, and outright parenting siblings.

It is very hard for a parentified child to relate to peers.  They have been so busy maintaining the emotional and physical needs that the parent has neglected that they have unmet developmental goals.  Letting go of feelings of responsibility and playing or being silly can be a challenge.

Art therapy is a powerful therapeutic method for these kids.  The art process helps loosen up rigidness and allows for a safe expression of playfulness and exploration.  One child who participated in art therapy started out feeling very self critical and afraid to make a mistake. Once she had developed trust with her therapist she was more tolerant to experiment and try new things risking mistakes.  To be able to tolerate mistakes is a huge milestone that mirrors the capacity to have self worth regardless of outcomes.   Children who parent, tend to have a great need to be the “good” child and have less tolerance for mistakes.  This is one way art therapy heals.

Watch for these behaviors:

  • Grades are falling
  • Not making or keeping friends
  • Acting depressed, anxious or uninterested in things
  • Overly concerned with siblings following rules
  • Overly interested in adults conversations
Advertisements

About Andrea Davis , LPC-AT-S, ATR-BC

I am a Board Certified Art Therapist and Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor in Dallas, Texas.
This entry was posted in Professional Topics. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s